All posts tagged: gender-just peace

Reaching higher: Women liberators and gender

I have recently written an academic article titled “Reaching Higher: Women Liberators and Gender” which was published in the Horn of Africa Bulletin of the Life & Peace Institute in Uppsala (November-December 2016 Vol. 28, Issue 6). National Action Plans (NAPs) and Regional Action Plans (RAPs) on Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) are useful guides and advocacy tools for the implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR) 1325 on WPS and UNSCR 1820 on sexual violence against civilians and armed conflict, for both state actors and civil society organizations. However, such documents have been slow on bringing about the desired social change. This is even more problematic for countries that have yet to develop NAPs. In the Horn of Africa[1], only three out of the eight members of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) have NAPs on WPS, two of which were adopted in 2016, 16 years after the adoption of UNSCR 1325. To promote the WPS agenda in the Horn, IGAD adopted the IGAD Regional Action Plan (IGAD-RAP) for 2011-2015 to implement UNSCRs 1325 …

Act on 2250 by implementing campaigns, programs and projects for gender-just peace

Today marks the 1 year anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 2250. I remember the day that it was announced (9 December 2015), and how quickly myself and the many of my friends, young peacebuilders from all over the world, were circulating the news on social media. We were euphoric about this historical milestone, something we have dreamed of for years, especially as we had familiarized ourselves with the UNSC Resolution 1325 (adopted in the year 2000) on Women, Peace and Security. Young peacebuilders had wanted and worked hard to have a resolution they could call their own, and to have all of that effort finally recognized at the UN level was more than wonderful; it was extraordinary. I think it revived hope in many of us, a hope that was diminishing considering the growth of conflict, internally displaced peoples, refugees, human trafficking, gender-based violence, and populist politics that both ignites extremism as well as makes invisible the agency young people have and can possess in bringing about sustainable peace. But like …