All posts filed under: Postcolonialism

Reaching higher: Women liberators and gender

I have recently written an academic article titled “Reaching Higher: Women Liberators and Gender” which was published in the Horn of Africa Bulletin of the Life & Peace Institute in Uppsala (November-December 2016 Vol. 28, Issue 6). National Action Plans (NAPs) and Regional Action Plans (RAPs) on Women, Peace, and Security (WPS) are useful guides and advocacy tools for the implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR) 1325 on WPS and UNSCR 1820 on sexual violence against civilians and armed conflict, for both state actors and civil society organizations. However, such documents have been slow on bringing about the desired social change. This is even more problematic for countries that have yet to develop NAPs. In the Horn of Africa[1], only three out of the eight members of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) have NAPs on WPS, two of which were adopted in 2016, 16 years after the adoption of UNSCR 1325. To promote the WPS agenda in the Horn, IGAD adopted the IGAD Regional Action Plan (IGAD-RAP) for 2011-2015 to implement UNSCRs 1325 …

Sweden’s Santa Lucia celebrations marked by epistemic violence against children of African decent

Ask the average Swede what the Santa Lucia celebration is about in terms of its historical/religious significance; chances are they won’t be able to give you straight forward answer because the details escape their memory. Like the below video mentions, when it comes to this Swedish tradition, “the why is less important than the how”. This morning (13 December 2016), thousands of children (and adults)–including my own three year old son–celebrated Santa Lucia by singing songs and eating pepparkakor (i.e. ginger bread cookies) and lussekatter (i.e. saffron buns) afterwards. Unfortunately, however, this year (around the 4th of December) saw an ugly controversy emerge when a Swedish department store called Åhléns posted an advertisement on its Facebook page that featured a Swedish child of African descent wearing the usual costume worn by children on Santa Lucia (a white robe and a crown of candles). The picture received a storm of racist comments (and love by anti-racists) to the point where  Åhléns removed the picture in consideration of the child and his family. Apparently, some within the Swedish society …

Frantz Fanon still lives

  December 6, 1961, marks the 55th year since the death of Frantz Fanon. Although this great thinker and writer is no longer with us, his legacy lives on. Below are some of his books… absolute MUST READS! #DecolonizeYourMind Video from teleSur English (https://www.facebook.com/telesurenglish/) MUST READS! Black Skin, White Masks (1952) The Wretched of the Earth (1961) Toward the African Revolution (1964) A Dying Colonialism (1959)

Decolonizing the Mind through Books

In 1997, rappers of conscious Talib Kweli and Yasiin Bey (AKA Mos Def) poured their rap money into Nkiru Books, Brooklyn’s first Black bookstore, where Kweli was also an employee when their album, Black Star, was released. On the 28th of December 2015, Kweli had posted a picture on Facebook talking about how despite the fact that they weren’t able to save Nkiru’s location, he will reignite Nkiru Books online, selling books of literature, education, history and culture of people of color, through his website. Just looking at the book covers posted on his website makes me drool! Even if one chooses not to purchase these gems directly through the website, the website makes an awesome guide to books you can borrow from the library in a quest to decolonize your mind. Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Angela Davis, W.E.B. du Bois, Audre Lorde, bell hooks… the list goes on. Here’s an interesting article on why we must read the books written by writers of color, especially as they courageously stare down on the …

Akon: ‘America was never built for black people’

Talk to Al Jazeera, a program on Al Jazeera English, interviewed Akon, the Senegalese-American recording artist in January 2015. I am reposting the interview and the content of the article written about the interview by Al Jazeera here because I found it to not only be intriguing, but very telling of the ambivalence in relationships and understandings between Africans and African-Americans. More importantly, Akon’s interview about his project ‘Akon Lighting Africa’ is a great example of the current movement of Africans in the Diaspora who are using their influence, expertise and wealth to give back to their beloved continent. Senegalese-American artist Akon is a five-time Grammy nominee who has sold over 35 million records worldwide, and has collaborated with some of the biggest names in popular music, such as Michael Jackson, Snoop Dogg, Lady Gaga and David Guetta. The musician, songwriter and producer, who was born in the US but spent much of his childhood in Senegal, is also an activist and a philanthropist – and he has turned his sights on helping Africa. How many …

West not in moral position to tell anybody how corrupt they are

Below is a clip from an interview  of Louis Farrakhan conducted in 1996 by Mike Wallace from ’60 minutes’ (an American television newsmagazine program). Mike Wallace accuses Nigeria of being the most corrupt nation in the world… and Louis Farrakhan’s epic response still holds true to this very day. In fact, his message resonates true to just about all western countries.